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History: Chicago Style

Chicago Style

For assistance with citing works in Chicago Style, visit our Chicago Style Guide or see the links below.

Citation Management Tools

Using citation management tools such as Zotero can help you keep track of your sources and quickly and easily create accurate citations.

For more information about using Zotero to manage your citations, see the Zotero research guide.

Notes and Bibliography

In Chicago notes and bibliography style, add a superscript number at the end of the sentence in which you use the source as well as a correspondingly numbered note. The note should contain bibliographic information (author, title, and facts of publication) followed by the relevant page numbers:

1. Christopher M. Church, Paradise Destroyed: Catastrophe and Citizenship in the French Caribbean (Lincoln, NE: University of Nebraska Press, 2017), 110-113.

If you cite the same source again, you may shorten the following notes:

2. Church, Paradise Destroyed, 115.

At the end of your paper, you will include a complete bibliography: a list of all the sources cited in your notes as well as some others you consulted but did not use. The bibliography lists sources alphabetically (by author or editor) and includes complete bibliographic information for each source, but in a slightly different format than in the notes:

Church, Christopher M. Paradise Destroyed: Catastrophe and Citizenship in the French Caribbean. Lincoln, NE: University of Nebraska Press, 2017.

Note that the author's first name comes first in the note, but the last name comes first in the bibliography.


Book

Note

3. Renata Keller, Mexico's Cold War: Cuba, the United States, and the Legacy of the Mexican Revolution (New York: Cambridge University Press, 2015), 170-171.

Shortened Note

4. Keller, Mexico's Cold War, 188.

Bibliography

Keller, Renata. Mexico's Cold War: Cuba, the United States, and the Legacy of the Mexican Revolution. New York: Cambridge University Press, 2015.


Journal Article

Note

5. Sarah Keyes, "'Like a Roaring Lion': The Overland Trail as a Sonic Conquest," Journal of American History 96, no. 1 (June 2009): 21, https://doi.org/10.2307/27694730.

Shortened Note

6. Keyes, "'Like a Roaring Lion'," 35.

Bibliography

Keyes, Sarah. "'Like a Roaring Lion': The Overland Trail as a Sonic Conquest." Journal of American History 96, no. 1 (June 2009): 18-43, https://doi.org/10.2307/27694730.